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For which foods on the salad bar do we take temperatures?

The U.S. Food Code (2005) -- the basis of the HACCP Plan -- cites that heat-treated plant foods that are low acid, high moisture, and containing protein are potentially hazardous. Therefore, unless the produce items are heated, they are not classified as potentially hazardous. The only exception to this rule are: cut melon, cut tomatoes, and alfalfa sprouts. These food items must be maintained at 41 degrees F or colder.

The first thing to do is to identify which of the foods on the salad bar are classified as potentially hazardous. The first container of all potentially hazardous foods that are placed on the serving line must be checked to be sure that they are at 41 degrees F or colder and the temperature recorded on the production record. All containers that are used thereafter must be checked before placement on the serving line but the temperature does not need to be recorded.

NOTE:  The standards outlined in the NC School HACCP Plan are minimum standards.  Each school district can establish higher standards.  For example, some districts might require that all food items on the salad bar (not just potentially hazardous foods) be at 41 degrees F or colder.  Thus, cut fruit, canned fruits, lettuce, and tomato would all have to be kept at 41 degrees F or colder.